Blackmill by Vivian Han on Grooveshark Vivacious vivo-lution
Life is to be savoured, not saved. <3
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Reblogged from theorganizedcoyote  3,918 notes

studylikeadoctor:

HOW TO ORGANIZE YOUR STUDYING SCHEDULE: 

Hey guys!! Since some of you asked me how I organized my studying schedule for this summer, I thought it would be best to make a post about it. It’s the first time I make a post such as this, and I’m sorry for the poor quality of my photos, but my mobile phone has the only camera I have at hand, so let’s get down to business! 

  1. KNOW YOUR DEADLINES: It’s important to know when do you have your exams, when is that essay due and so on. This way you’ll keep track of time and you’ll know how much time you need to commit to each task. I would advise color coding each one, as I did with the subjects which exams I have to retake in september. This way, you’ll have your goals and needs always in mind. 
  2. KNOW WHAT YOU NEED TO STUDY: It’s important to be sure of all the things you need to study. As you can see in this image, I wrote down every unit I need to know for my anatomy exam, and I did the same for the other subjects as well. I also added a little checkbox beside each unit in order to keep track of all the times I revise each one so I can know at a glance how I’m doing and where I need to improve. 
  3. USE ADDITIONAL TOOLS: Getrevising is a webpage that can help you create a schedule if you don’t know where to start. It gives you the opportunity to, completely free, add your classes, appointments, subjects and deadlines to create a schedule. You can also give a priority to each subject so they can assign more study hours to those subjects you find more difficult or where you need to invest more time. I used it as a reference, because it is not perfect, and I don’t know if it’s possible to change the study blocks from 1 hour sessions to longer or shorter ones, but it helps you to make an idea of how many hours you should invest in each subject. Anyway, this tool is completely unnecessary, but I used it because my study schedule is for the whole summer (that’ll be two months of holidays) and so I felt a bit overwhelmed by how many things I needed to tackle. 
  4. EDIT AND WRITE YOUR OWN SCHEDULE ATTENDING TO YOUR NEEDS: The most important thing when you write your study schedule is to know your strengths and limits. I printed a weekly schedule from my laptop iCal to see at a simple glance how many things I had going on in a week and how many hours I could dedicate to study. You can find simple weekly calendars anyway or you can even make your own. The first thing I wrote down were all those unavoidable things such as birthday parties and weddings and medical appointments as well as those things I want to do daily such as running, bathing, walking the dog or reading a bit at night. Once this is done, I can see how many free hours for studying I have, and if I feel like they are not enough, I cut down some things that aren’t completely necessary, because sometimes what is necessary is to make some sacrifices. But remember to always leave some free time for yourself, because it’s good for you to relax and get some strength back. Then, looking at your get revising schedule or simply knowing your needs, write down every day which units you are going to study. Try to be realistic, and don’t cram things in every study session. If you can only study tree units in one morning, then do that. Otherwise you’ll feel stressed and you won’t keep up with your schedule, which can make you feel bad and think that it’s not being useful at all. I’d also recommend highlighting your subjects with the same colors you used for your deadlines calendar, because it’ll help you make an idea in your head of your week. 
  5. TRANSFORM YOUR WEEKLY SCHEDULE INTO A DAILY ONE: I find it better to, once a weekly schedule is prepared, write it down as a daily one, to the hour. Some people may think this is a bit obsessive, but it makes me less stressed knowing what I should be doing in every study session. Moreover, it makes me feel satisfied crossing out things I have already done, and crossing them out of my list! If you’ll feel stressed watching the things you have to do every hour using just the weekly schedule may be fine for you. I used a simple lined notebook and wrote the hours myself. 
  6. PLUS:KEEP TRACK OF YOUR PROGRESS: If you don’t want to make a daily schedule, or if you’re not accustomed to follow a schedule this thick, you may find useful keeping track of your progress. You can write down what you do every hour your dedicating to studying, or maybe you can write down things as “I planned to study for 3 hours with two 10 minutes breaks and I managed to study just 2 units when I planned to study 3”. This may help you know your weaknesses and analyze what you’re doing right and what you’re doing wrong. When you realise things as this, you’ll find it easier to make a reliable and realistic schedule that is up to your needs and strong points. This way you’ll know if you work better in the mornings or the afternoons, if you get distracted easily… But remember that the most important thing is to take things easily and bit by bit. Everyone works differently, and what may work for others may not work for you. Analyze and know yourself, and then no one or anything will stop you. 

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I hope you found this helpful. I know this is just my method, but some of you were curious about it and I find inspiring knowing about other people’s methods. This way you can find your inspiration to work out your own methods and habits, and you’l feel much less frustrated when you manage to achieve your goals, but take your time and be patient. Succeed will take your hand if you work hard a bit everyday!!!! 

Reblogged from study-mode  156,045 notes
college-campuses:

I saw a few masterposts going around tumblr and decided to make one. A lot of these links are helpful for High School as well! Enjoy and please tell me if you have problems with any link.
Blogs
onlinecounsellingcollege
fyeahcooldormrooms
freshmantips
theprospectblog
Studying
Flashcards
Calculators
Online Ruler
Thinking &amp; Memorizing Tips
Research &amp; Reading Tips
Finals Help Guide
Homework Help
Math Help
Geography Help
Study Playlist
Convert Anything To Anything
Productive Study Break Tips
Pull an All Nighter &amp; Do Well On Your Exam
AP Cram Packets
Writing Help
Free Microsoft Word Equivalent
Writing Software Master post
Cant Remember A Word?
Bibliography Maker
Social Media Citation Guide
Earn A Cute Picture Of A Kitten For Writing
Writers Block?
Coffee Shop Sounds
Essay Structure Guide
Want To Know Who You Write Like?
Books
Alternatives To Expensive Textbooks
Download Free Books
Download Free Kindle Books
Free Audio Books
Sad/Stressed
Thoughts Room
Panic &amp; Anxiety Masterpost
Guided Relaxation
Stress Relievers
Chill Playlist
Cute Videos
Food
Quick &amp; Easy Snack Recipes
Study Snacks
The Collegiate Vegan
On The Go Breakfast Recipes
Brownie In A Cup
Miscellaneous
Check The Safety Of Any Website
Download From 8tracks
Is This Website Down For Me Or Everyone?
Self Defense Tips
Upload Anything From Your Smartphone To You Laptop
Chrome Extension Tells You Which Tab Is Playing Music
Prevent Hangovers
Netflix Recommendations 
Becoming An Adult Masterpost
All The Audios You’ve Ever Reblogged
Stream/Watch Free TV/Movies
Never Hit A Dead End With A Broken Link
Downloadable PDF To-Do Lists
Watch Musicals
List Of Universities On Tumblr

college-campuses:

I saw a few masterposts going around tumblr and decided to make one. A lot of these links are helpful for High School as well! Enjoy and please tell me if you have problems with any link.

Blogs

onlinecounsellingcollege

fyeahcooldormrooms

freshmantips

theprospectblog

Studying

Flashcards

Calculators

Online Ruler

Thinking & Memorizing Tips

Research & Reading Tips

Finals Help Guide

Homework Help

Math Help

Geography Help

Study Playlist

Convert Anything To Anything

Productive Study Break Tips

Pull an All Nighter & Do Well On Your Exam

AP Cram Packets

Writing Help

Free Microsoft Word Equivalent

Writing Software Master post

Cant Remember A Word?

Bibliography Maker

Social Media Citation Guide

Earn A Cute Picture Of A Kitten For Writing

Writers Block?

Coffee Shop Sounds

Essay Structure Guide

Want To Know Who You Write Like?

Books

Alternatives To Expensive Textbooks

Download Free Books

Download Free Kindle Books

Free Audio Books

Sad/Stressed

Thoughts Room

Panic & Anxiety Masterpost

Guided Relaxation

Stress Relievers

Chill Playlist

Cute Videos

Food

Quick & Easy Snack Recipes

Study Snacks

The Collegiate Vegan

On The Go Breakfast Recipes

Brownie In A Cup

Miscellaneous

Check The Safety Of Any Website

Download From 8tracks

Is This Website Down For Me Or Everyone?

Self Defense Tips

Upload Anything From Your Smartphone To You Laptop

Chrome Extension Tells You Which Tab Is Playing Music

Prevent Hangovers

Netflix Recommendations 

Becoming An Adult Masterpost

All The Audios You’ve Ever Reblogged

Stream/Watch Free TV/Movies

Never Hit A Dead End With A Broken Link

Downloadable PDF To-Do Lists

Watch Musicals

List Of Universities On Tumblr

Reblogged from we-are-star-stuff  443 notes
neuromorphogenesis:

Nanoparticles may harm the brain
A simple change in electric charge may make the difference between someone getting the medicine they need and a trip to the emergency room—at least if a new study bears out. Researchers investigating the toxicity of particles designed to ferry drugs inside the body have found that carriers with a positive charge on their surface appear to cause damage if they reach the brain.
These particles, called micelles, are one type of a class of materials known as nanoparticles. By varying properties such as charge, composition, and attached surface molecules, researchers can design nanoparticles to deliver medicine to specific body regions and cell types—and even to carry medicine into cells. This ability allows drugs to directly target locations they would otherwise be unable to, such as the heart of tumors. Researchers are also looking at nanoparticles as a way to transport drugs across the blood-brain barrier, a wall of tightly connected cells that keeps most medication out of the brain. Just how safe nanoparticles in the brain are, however, remains unclear.
So Kristina Bram Knudsen, a toxicologist at the National Research Centre for the Working Environment in Copenhagen, and colleagues tested two types of micelles, which were made from different polymers that gave the micelles either a positive or negative surface charge. They injected both versions, empty of drugs, into the brains of rats, and 1 week later they checked for damage. Three out of the five rats injected with the positively charged micelles developed brain lesions. The rats injected with the negatively charged micelles or a saline control solution did not suffer any observable harm from the injections, the team will report in an upcoming issue of Nanotoxicology.
Knudsen speculates that one of the attributes that makes positive micelles and similar nanoparticles such powerful drug delivery systems may also be what is causing the brain damage. Because cells have a negative charge on their outside, they attract positively charged micelles and bring them into the cell. The micelles’ presence in the cell or alteration of the cell’s surface charge, she says, may disrupt the cell’s normal functioning.
Negatively charged nanoparticles can also enter cells, according to other research. However, they do so less readily and must be able to overcome the repulsion between themselves and the cell surface. It is possible that the reason the negatively charged micelles were not found to be toxic was that they did not invade cells to the same extent as the positively charged micelles. 
The findings are intriguing, says biomedical engineer Jordan Green of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. But he cautions that there is no evidence that all positively charged nanoparticles behave this way. Other factors can also play a role in the toxicity of nanoparticles, adds pharmaceutical expert Jian-Qing Gao of Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China. The size and concentration of the particles, as well as the strain of rat used, could all have influenced the results, he says.

neuromorphogenesis:

Nanoparticles may harm the brain

A simple change in electric charge may make the difference between someone getting the medicine they need and a trip to the emergency room—at least if a new study bears out. Researchers investigating the toxicity of particles designed to ferry drugs inside the body have found that carriers with a positive charge on their surface appear to cause damage if they reach the brain.

These particles, called micelles, are one type of a class of materials known as nanoparticles. By varying properties such as charge, composition, and attached surface molecules, researchers can design nanoparticles to deliver medicine to specific body regions and cell types—and even to carry medicine into cells. This ability allows drugs to directly target locations they would otherwise be unable to, such as the heart of tumors. Researchers are also looking at nanoparticles as a way to transport drugs across the blood-brain barrier, a wall of tightly connected cells that keeps most medication out of the brain. Just how safe nanoparticles in the brain are, however, remains unclear.

So Kristina Bram Knudsen, a toxicologist at the National Research Centre for the Working Environment in Copenhagen, and colleagues tested two types of micelles, which were made from different polymers that gave the micelles either a positive or negative surface charge. They injected both versions, empty of drugs, into the brains of rats, and 1 week later they checked for damage. Three out of the five rats injected with the positively charged micelles developed brain lesions. The rats injected with the negatively charged micelles or a saline control solution did not suffer any observable harm from the injections, the team will report in an upcoming issue of Nanotoxicology.

Knudsen speculates that one of the attributes that makes positive micelles and similar nanoparticles such powerful drug delivery systems may also be what is causing the brain damage. Because cells have a negative charge on their outside, they attract positively charged micelles and bring them into the cell. The micelles’ presence in the cell or alteration of the cell’s surface charge, she says, may disrupt the cell’s normal functioning.

Negatively charged nanoparticles can also enter cells, according to other research. However, they do so less readily and must be able to overcome the repulsion between themselves and the cell surface. It is possible that the reason the negatively charged micelles were not found to be toxic was that they did not invade cells to the same extent as the positively charged micelles. 

The findings are intriguing, says biomedical engineer Jordan Green of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. But he cautions that there is no evidence that all positively charged nanoparticles behave this way. Other factors can also play a role in the toxicity of nanoparticles, adds pharmaceutical expert Jian-Qing Gao of Zhejiang University in Hangzhou, China. The size and concentration of the particles, as well as the strain of rat used, could all have influenced the results, he says.